Month: August 2021

Since the COVID-19 pandemic reached the United States in early 2020, scientists have struggled to find laboratory models of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the respiratory virus that causes COVID-19. Animal models fell short; attempts to grow adult human lungs have historically failed because not all of the cell types survived. Undaunted, stem cell scientists, cell biologists, infectious
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This article may include advertisements, paid product features, affiliate links and other forms of sponsorship. As we raise our children, we hope to send them off one day with all of the essential tools to be productive members of society. We help them gather all of the mechanisms they will need to be successful so
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Northwestern Medicine scientists continue to investigate all aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic: from molecular mechanisms of infection, to child hospitalization and single-dose vaccine response. One dose not enough for previously infected Thomas McDade, PhD, professor of Medical Social Sciences, was senior author of the study published in EClinical Medicine. One dose of an mRNA vaccine
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A deep look into a nationwide mass vaccination setting in Israel revealed that the BNT162b2 (Pfizer–BioNTech) vaccine is not linked with an elevated risk of a majority of the adverse events under study, with the exception of myocarditis. However, even that potentially severe adverse event is much more pervasive following the infection with severe acute
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Children with infantile spasms, a rare form of epileptic seizures, should be treated with one of three recommended therapies and the use of non-standard therapies should be strongly discouraged, according to a study of their effectiveness by a Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigator and collaborating colleagues in the Pediatric Epilepsy Research Consortium. Early treatment
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), breast milk doesn’t require heating. One can feed room temperature or cold breast milk to their baby (1). Yet, several parents prefer warming refrigerated or frozen breast milk mainly for two common reasons. Firstly, warming stored breast milk helps to
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Researchers with the Vanderbilt Diabetes Research and Training Center (DRTC) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center led a multisite study which has demonstrated that, when controlled and standardized, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pancreas is highly reproducible when using different MRI hardware and software at different geographic locations. This finding opens up a new
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Researchers from the HSE Centre for Language and Brain and their Russian and American colleagues have become the first to compare expressive and receptive language abilities of Russian children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at different linguistic levels. Their work helped them refute the hypothesis that children with ASD understand spoken language less well than
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From the playground to the park and everywhere in-between, get ready for a season of adventure with our latest collection of outerwear for girls and boys. Featuring stylish gilets, cosy jackets and more, these are the perfect layers to complete their back-to-school wardrobe. Shop our new outerwear collection now, available online and in-store. #BackToSchool #Outerwear
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Furniture and TV tip-overs are an important source of injury, especially for children younger than 6 years old. A recent study led by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that an estimated 560,200 children younger than 18 years old were treated in U.S. emergency departments for furniture
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Raelene Dundon will never forget the day she realized it was time to tell her preschool son he was autistic.* When they were visiting her eldest son’s classroom for story time, some of the students noticed that the younger boy seemed similar to their autistic classmate and told Dundon’s eldest that his brother had autism.
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When Linda James was pregnant with her first baby, a boy who is now four, her mother-in-law, who lives in the United States, seemed benevolent and excited. By the time she and her husband arrived in Toronto to meet the newborn—the baby who made her a grandmother—she had morphed into a judgy, argumentative interrogator who
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Early in the tumultuous 2020-21 school year, Missouri officials made a big gamble: set aside roughly 1 million rapid covid tests for the state’s K-12 schools in hopes of quickly identifying sick students or staff members. The Trump administration had spent $760 million to procure 150 million rapid-response antigen tests from Abbott Laboratories, including 1.75
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